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zephyr   zephyr Dennis Dames's TIGblog
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Jamaica and the Caribbean Court of Justice and regional integration

By Oscar Ramjeet:


Dr Oswald Harding, who was the attorney general of Jamaica when the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) was first touted in the late 1980s and the early 1990s, has explained to me why Jamaica has not yet abolished appeals to the Privy Council and joined the CCJ as the final court.

The former Jamaica Attorney General and his Trinidad and Tobago counterpart, Selwyn Richardson, were moving from island to island encouraging governments to join the regional court, but after 20 years these two countries are still to accept the CCJ as the final Court.

Dr Harding, who is now the President of the Senate, in an exclusive interview with me said that the Jamaica Labour Party (JLP) has always been in favour of the regional Court, but said that there were a few distractions in the 1990s: Richardson was murdered and the JLP lost the government among others.

He explained that the Peoples National Party government under P.J. Patterson then started to railroad activities in a move to remove the Privy Council as the final court by passing legislation without consulting the JLP, which was later struck down by the London-based Privy Council.

He added that the Jamaican government is contributing 27% of the costs to run and administer the Court and has not been getting any benefit whatsoever since it has not joined the Appellate Division because the Privy Council is still the final Court and he referred to the attitude of the CCJ Judges.

The Senior Counsel said that he is not happy with the composition of the Court and pointed out that seven highly qualified and experienced Jamaican lawyers had applied for a position in the Court, but they were all turned down in favour of less experienced candidates.

Touching on talks and discussions about Caribbean integration, the President of the Senate referred to a publication "integrate or perish". He said that there is too much talk and less action in this regard and referred to the stand taken by some regional governments on the question of freedom of movement.

He said that some governments change the goal post when it is convenient to them and there must be a change of attitude.

Meanwhile, Jamaican Attorney General, Dorothy Lightbourne, indicated to me that her country is about to take steps to remove the Privy Council as the final Court, and Belize Prime Minister Dean Barrow has already tabled a Motion in Parliament to amend the Constitution to facilitate the CCJ as the final Court.

In fact the Belize Government, although there is no need for a referendum to effect the change, has launched public aware consultations throughout the country to sensitise constituents on the proposed constitutional changes.

A few other countries, including Grenada, St Lucia and St Vincent and the Grenadines, have signalled their interest in joining the regional Appellate Court as well.

The Trinidad and Tobago Government is willing to go on board, but before it can do so it has to get the sanction of the Opposition since it requires two thirds majority in order to secure the amendment.

Only two countries, Guyana and Barbados, are members of the Appellate Jurisdiction of the Court, which was established more than four years ago.

November 24, 2009

caribbeannetnews


November 24, 2009 | 3:18 PM Comments  {num} comments



zephyr   zephyr Dennis Dames's TIGblog
Dennis Dames's profile

Bahamas: Foreign currency debt below '10% of our GDP'
Related to country: Bahamas


By NEIL HARTNELL:

Tribune Business Editor -

THE Bahamas is "unique" among its peers because of its relatively low level of foreign currency indebtedness, the minister of state for finance has told Tribune Business, adding that the recent $300 million sovereign bond issue had still left the Government's foreign debt at around $600 million - below 10 per cent of per annum GDP.

"Our level of foreign currency debt is less than 10 per cent of our GDP," the minister told Tribune Business subsequent to last week's $300 million sovereign bond issue, which was exclusively revealed by this newspaper.

"There is no objective analyst in the world who would regard that as problematic. The Bahamas stands as unique in that regard - that low level of foreign currency indebtedness. Our indebtedness, as a ratio of debt-to-GDP, remains a far cry from many in the developing world."

Mr Laing, responding to Opposition-led charges that last week's $300 million, US-dollar denominated sovereign bond issue showed the Government was "going on a spending spree" and saddling future Bahamian generations with an unsustainable debt burden, told Tribune Business that the end result was a "net $100 million increase" in the public debt load.

This was because some two-thirds, or $200 million, of the principal raised was being used to refinance - essentially, pay-off - a $200 million foreign currency bridging loan that the Government took out last year from a syndicate of Bahamas-based banks, when it realised the global recession might create some holes in the public finances.

The $300 million sovereign bond "now turns out an existing $200 million loan and adds $100 million to fund a planned deficit", Mr Laing said. "Once this is done, [foreign currency debt] will be of the order of $600 million."

Recalling the Government's other outstanding foreign currency debt, the minister said the former PLP government had issued its own $200 million US dollar-denominated foreign currency bond back in 2003.

Prior to that, the first Ingraham administration had left in place a $125 million syndicated loan with Bahamas-based commercial banks that the successor Christie government eventually drew down upon to minimise the impact of the September 11, 2001, terror attacks.

This had also been refinanced, while a further $100 million in foreign currency was borrowed in 2007-2008, Mr Laing said. The Central Bank of the Bahamas' statistics appear to support his position, as they show that the Government owed some $421.03 million to foreign creditors at the end of the 2009 second quarter.

Some $121 million of this debt consisted of foreign currency bank loans, with the remainder some $300 million in government securities or bonds. Thus the "net $100 million increase" in the Bahamas' foreign currency indebtedness will, based on that data, take the total to between $500-$600 million - in line with Mr Laing's figures.

The Government chose to issue the $300 million sovereign bond, priced at between 7-7.125 per cent with a 20-year maturity to 2030, in US dollars to ensure it did not draw down on local system liquidity - standing at $464 million at end-September 2009 - and crowd out the private sector.

The borrowings were also likely to provide a temporary boost to the Bahamas' foreign reserves, and the existing low level of foreign currency indebtedness, coupled with this nation's relatively strong credit rating and capital markets position, provided further compelling reasons.

"In the circumstances, it is a financing management arrangement that just makes sense," Mr Laing told Tribune Business. "We were pleased with the fact that investors responded so swiftly to the offering, and that the Bahamas had a unique story. If we had put out more, that would have sold, too. We were oversubscribed by $83 million."

November 23, 2009

tribune242


November 23, 2009 | 4:15 PM Comments  {num} comments



calieel   calieel Rashad Amahad's TIGblog
Rashad Amahad's profile

The Bahamian youth are so inspiring,
Related to country: Bahamas


I had a wonderful opportunity to sit down and listen to healthy dialogue with the youth of my country.I was proud of each and every one these young people are so on point it is incredible.I see where the fault lies not in the intelligence of the people but rather the outlet that channels the voices of the youth that have the solutions.

The CSME,what does it have to do with the Bahamas our brothers and sisters in the caribbean have the same issues. We here in the Bahamas are more fortunate because of the proximity to the north.However we have the same concerns.

I believe we need to move more gradual towards the idea however what needs to be done is a proper job of marketing the benefits.Who is funding this, two European countries Spain is one here is my take they realise the wrong they have done and now want to be in the forefront to repair which is not possible but they are which is great drumming up the debate or dialogue that is needed to really say to the caribbean you need to take care of yourselves and come away from the colonial system, wait until the mother land send the help we have come of age now we should not wait for a support that does not exsist.The two countries in the European region are doing what they should have done long ago and others need to come on board to facilate the change .This is all heading to globilization.The fight is between the west and the east for territory again,we need to realize that we can come together and harness the power,
Cuba has to be a player in this who in my opinion the leader ands what they need to do is show and we need to go to them for the assistance.I don't need to be communist to look at something that works an be able to learn from it.

Think Global and act local,the carribean needs to recognise this before they become engulfed again to be the slaves of the civilised world the reason they are called this is because the swear to the dogmas of no man.

To be enslaved in anyway this is insanity,this my friends is to be uncivilised.Upwarded onward together.One Country united in love and service.

November 22, 2009 | 3:31 PM Comments  {num} comments

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zephyr   zephyr Dennis Dames's TIGblog
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Bahamas ranked 11th out of 12 in 'attractiveness to wealthy' survey
Related to country: Bahamas


By NEIL HARTNELL:

Tribune Business Editor -


THE Bahamas would have ranked 11 out of 12 major international financial centres had it been included in a survey designed to measure the attractiveness of these nations to 'mobile' high net worth individuals.

Stephen Wall, director of the Scorpio Partnership, an international wealth management consultancy, presented to the Nassau Conference a survey that analysed the factors influencing high net worth individuals when it came to deciding which jurisdiction to base themselves in.

The Mobile Wealth Residency Index (MWRI), Mr Wall said, focused on 11 jurisdictions, but had the Bahamas been included it would have placed 11th out of 12, ranking only ahead of Guernsey. The others rated were among this nation's chief competitors: Cayman, Singapore, Switzerland, Dubai, Hong Kong, Isle of Man, Jersey, London, New York, and Monaco.

Mr Wall said Switzerland's 'all-round appeal' had placed it at number one, even though it was ranked only fifth for tax appeal, since its "multi-faceted" qualities were "attracting a wide range of mobile wealthy". Switzerland, he said, ranked at the top for economic and political stability, legal considerations, proximity and convenience, education for children and culture/infrastructure.

In contrast, the Bahamas was ranked bottom out of 12 by the MWRI Index when it came to economic and political stability, and employment/business opportunities. It was also placed 11th for legal considerations and 10th for sophistication/culture/infrastructure.

However, Mr Wall said the Bahamas enjoyed "strong positioning" in areas such as tax and immigration, where it was third; availability of quality housing, where it was second; security, where it was third; and education for children, where it was fifth.

November 20, 2009

tribune242



November 21, 2009 | 4:33 PM Comments  {num} comments



zephyr   zephyr Dennis Dames's TIGblog
Dennis Dames's profile

Jamaica: Hoping for a bold Mr Golding
Related to country: Jamaica


It is good that neither Prime Minister Golding nor Finance Minister Shaw feels it worthwhile to attack Moody's over its downgrade of Jamaica's sovereign debt by two rungs to Caa1. That would be just a case of shooting the messenger, as was the case a fortnight ago when Standard and Poor's (S&P) was lambasted for lowering its rating of Jamaica one slot to CCC, with a negative outlook.

The truth is, Jamaica is in dire economic straits without any clearly articulated prescriptions for extricating itself from the mess. And the Government carries, on the face of it, an unsustainable debt burden of nearly $1.3 trillion.

What S&P and now Moody's have done is to alert Jamaica's lenders to the possibility that, despite the country's proud history of paying its debt and the strong commitment of the Government to continue doing so, some of their money could be at risk. As unpalatable as that message may be to us, it is a clearly reasonable action on the part of the rating agencies.

Three per cent decline

Indeed, coincidental with Moody's report was an announcement by the Planning Institute of Jamaica that the economy declined by over three per cent in the third quarter, staying on course for a contraction by up to four per cent this fiscal year. The alumina sector has all but collapsed and remittances are down by around 15 per cent. Tourism, the third significant earner of foreign exchange, is up marginally, but not sufficient to cushion the fallout elsewhere. Moreover, as Moody's cited, the Government, which is having serious trouble holding the fiscal deficit to the revised 8.5 per cent of GDP, has not yet completed negotiations with the International Monetary Fund for US$1.2 billion in loans.

The situation seems rather uncertain. Hard economic times demand tough action and, we would suggest, bold initiatives. It is into this new direction that we hope Prime Minister Golding is about to head and why there is no angry response to Moody's latest rating.

Expectations

Should we be right, we expect to see first an articulation of the new and revised strategies at this weekend's annual conference of the governing Jamaica Labour Party, and certainly when Prime Minister Golding addresses the public session on Sunday.

Mr Golding, in that regard, will be clear that he cannot presume that he is talking to the party faithful; that speech has to be about mobilising all Jamaica for the difficulties ahead. He must declare his intent to behave as though he is only now just starting out in government and that he has three years to complete the task - and that is all the time he will ever have. In other words, he will be bold, doing what he knows to be right and necessary, whatever the political consequences.

The prime minister must then gather all stakeholders, including the domestics holders of the country's bonds, for a frank discourse on the sacrifices expected from all to lift the country out of the quagmire. As part of this process, we suggest that Mr Golding gather a 'council of wise persons', whatever their political persuasion and representing the best possible talent, to help in the formulation and aggressive implementation of necessary and agreed policies.

The times call for extraordinary leadership, which we hope Mr Golding can deliver.


November 20, 2009


jamaica-gleaner



November 20, 2009 | 9:33 PM Comments  {num} comments



zephyr   zephyr Dennis Dames's TIGblog
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Jamaica: Where 'Dudus' Coke meets Transparency International
Related to country: Jamaica


The Golding administration can claim, with fair justification, that it is lugging the baggage of its predecessor with regard to public perception about corruption in Jamaica.

However, Prime Minister Golding and others in the Government would be mistaken if they attempt to blame only the stewardship of the People's National Party (PNP) on the country's most recent downgrade on Transparency International's lastest corruption perception index released this week.

On this index, in which the best possible score is 10, Jamaica scored 3.1, down from 3.7 in 2006, to rank 99 of 180 countries rated by Transparency International on its corruption index. This is three places down from a year ago.

More significantly, it is a slide of 15 slots since 2007, the year Mr Golding's Jamaica Labour Party (JLP) won the general election to end the PNP's 18-year hold on government.

This newspaper, of course, does not claim that corruption in Jamaica has worsened - if, indeed, things have deteriorated - to the extent that a superficial reading of the slippage would suggest. The current ranking is a combination of improvement by others and a failure by Jamaica to do enough to battle actual and perceived corruption.

Combat corruption

Indeed, Contractor General Greg Christie reminded the public this week that Jamaican governments, including this one, have not been energetic enough in upgrading legislative and institutional arrangements to combat corruption.

As Mr Christie noted, and this newspaper previously argued, the Corruption Prevention Commission ought to be more aggressively policing misbehaviour by public officials, and lacks the resources to do the job adequately.

Similarly, the integrity laws covering the filing of assets and liability statements by parliamentarians need updating to broaden the requirements and to bring greater transparency to the process.

But building confidence and trust that Jamaica is a society that is turning its face hard against corruption will demand more than enacting laws and establishing institutions - although those are important. It will require, too, a fundamental shift in the political ethos.

A case in point is the Government's handling of America's request for the extradition of Christopher 'Dudus' Coke, the west Kingston 'businessman' and reputed 'don', whom Washington accuses of exporting narcotics to the United States and importing guns into Jamaica.

Conventional wisdom

Many Jamaicans are persuaded, we feel, that the Government has dithered on the request - and not because, as is claimed, the administration is intent on respecting the constitutional rights of a Jamaican citizen. The perception is that the Government is stalling because of who Coke is, where he is from and what he represents.

West Kingston is Prime Minister Golding's inherited parliamentary constituency, and Tivoli Gardens, where Coke has his base, is one of those political 'garrisons' where conventional wisdom presumes the soul of the JLP resides. West Kingston represents, for many, the classic nexus between politics and criminality, in changed circumstance. 'Community leaders' who, independently, can be benefactors in areas within which they operate, maintain allegiance to the traditional parties of the area, but no longer pay obeisance to politicians, as was the case years ago. Roles, in some respects, are reversed.

It is unfortunate that Mr Golding, the leader who set for himself new benchmarks for integrity and governance, appears unable to escape the old order of politics. We are sure that he understands just how intertwined are the 'Dudus affair' and the Transparency International rank.

November 19, 2009

jamaica-gleaner


November 19, 2009 | 11:41 AM Comments  {num} comments



calieel   calieel Rashad Amahad's TIGblog
Rashad Amahad's profile

I pledge my allegance to the commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Related to country: Bahamas


For which it stands one people united in love and service.We are united in love and service this is why I serve and hope that you will serve as well.We are much more intelligent than what the talk show host will like to bait us to think we can see beyond that fact they need to increase there rating to amp up the listing audience.

What we want is service to the people, the present administration is well aware that if they fail to do what is required they will get the answer at the polls on the voice of the people .Now we have moved passed the back and forth they want to see a new type of governance, we are subject to change.Have we not done so in the past, we have in everything else so tell me why the persons that the power is loan to seem to think that we can not are not fully functioning in the capacity as it relates to our thinking.

We in the Bahamas want a administration that listens to the voice of the people who will consult them as it relates to the issues of the day who will report to them the progress they are making.
We will not tolerate any dictator,we will not wait until the five year mark to make a decision.

The time in the Bahamas is NOW and if they are not listening then we will have someone who can hear the cry of the people, there is no reason why and island with less than two hundred thousand can not be managed properly it is riduculous to think so what is even more riduculous is that it is happening and there is no one to replace the faulty part or person.

Where is the Balm in Gilead? who will stand up for the orphans who will stand for the widows who will cry out for the slain the victims of homicide.

I will! now please join me and take down this sleeping giant. I will be the David for the Goliath.

Listen people of World I pledge my allegiance to the people of the Bahamas united in love and service.We have a loftier Goal .

November 19, 2009 | 7:27 AM Comments  {num} comments

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zephyr   zephyr Dennis Dames's TIGblog
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Barbados least corrupt, says Transparency International

BRIDGETOWN, Barbados, November 18, 2009 - Barbados is the least corrupt among nine Caribbean Community (CARICOM) countries surveyed by Transparency International (TI) in its Corruption Perception Index (CPI) this year.

The island ranked 20th among 180 countries just behind the United States on the CPI, which measures domestic, public sector corruption.

Among the CARICOM countries on the list which was released yesterday with New Zealand in the number one position, St Lucia ranked 22, St Vincent and the Grenadines 31, Dominica 34, Suriname 75, Trinidad and Tobago 79, Jamaica 99, and Guyana 126. Haiti was last among the region's countries, at 168.

None of these showed any significant increase in its score since last year, TI said.

It noted that among the 31 countries from the Americas included in the 2009 report, only 10 scored above five, "indicating a serious corruption problem". Of those 10, Barbados (7.4), St Lucia (7), St Vincent and the Grenadines (6.4) and Dominica (5.9) were the only CARICOM countries to make at least the halfway mark. Suriname got 3.7, Trinidad and Tobago 3.6, Jamaica 3, Guyana 2.6 and Haiti a mere 1.8.

"Although each country has its own particular context, across the board the effects of the financial crisis and the subsequent economic downturn have highlighted the crucial importance of governance in the private and public sectors and in relationships between the two, particularly in respect to stimulus packages which are already pumping large amounts of money into badly affected economies," TI said in its assessment of the performance of the countries of the Americas.

"States across the region - rich and poor - will have to respond by ensuring that these public funds are handled with integrity."

The CPI measures the perceived levels of public sector corruption in a given country and is a composite index, drawing on as many as 13 different expert and business surveys.

TI said that as the world economy begins to register a tentative recovery and some nations continue to wrestle with ongoing conflict and insecurity, it is clear that no region of the world is immune to the perils of corruption.

caribbean360


November 18, 2009 | 11:40 PM Comments  {num} comments



calieel   calieel Rashad Amahad's TIGblog
Rashad Amahad's profile

The Bahamas lawless, or clueless?
Related to country: Bahamas


What in the world is going on? Let me tell you what is happening in the Bahamas.Right now the murder rate may be 76 by the time I finish this post and another criminal may be given bail for a murder he committed three months ago.This is by no way a pleasure for me to write I am ashamed that my country can't seem to do anything with a handful of vandals,when I turn on the radio I am disgusted that all the people are doing is talking like that is all they could do there is one party the Workers Party that is petitioning the Government,The National Development Party have made communications to the Government of the Bahamas that they seem not to be listening to the people.So what do you do?well let me tell you what I will do.In the Bahamas we need to take the power away from those whom we intrusted it to and move swiftly to regain the control of law and order in our country it seems like so many other things we wait until it is too late.Or perhaps something needs to happen to the children or relatives of those in power to get their attention, I wonder why we have to wait so long to get things that really require one man to be man enough to take the helm of this run away state.I hear the kids are saying they need to get their guns,it is obvious to them that this little town is turning out to be the OK coral.Cowboys seem to think that their is no marshall in the town and they seem to be correct because nothing is being done .Here is what to do

Curfew has to be implemented rightaway going in to the christmas season.8pm anyone found on the street with out the proper reason will be arrested.

Laws have to be enacted to support the bail process for charged murders.No Bail/any gun related matters as well.


Social programs to inform youths of methods to resolve conflicts.Informing them of laws of civil disobedience and laws place to make the parents of such offenders to be fined and on summary conviction they must be jailed.

Community partnerships for a continual program of media and social iniatives.

Look at models from civilise societies and seek what thay are doing and implement forwith.

This is so simple it irks me that we the people allow this mayhem to carry on in this city of Gotham.

We the people are responsible because we do nothing but talk, and some how expect something to drop from the sky.

Rise up and free ourselves from this mental slavery we have a right to fight for a Bahamas that is free from crime.

November 17, 2009 | 12:47 PM Comments  {num} comments

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zephyr   zephyr Dennis Dames's TIGblog
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Bahamas Taps into Renewable Energy
Related to country: Bahamas


By: Gena Gibbs

BAHAMAS INFORMATION SERVICES:


Nassau, Bahamas - Renewable energy programs are quickly becoming the new solution to controlling escalating energy costs on the overburdened public utilities sector.

“The Bahamas Government views it as essential,” said Minister of State for the Environment, the Hon Phenton Neymour. “We have put initiatives in place to improve energy usage to reduce its negative impact on the economy.”

In 2001, the Bahamas spent approximately $273 million importing petroleum products. In 2007, that figure rose to $802 million and for 2008 it is estimated at $1 billion, Mr Neymour said.

He was addressing the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s 2009 Energy Conference at the Sheraton Cable Beach Conference Centre, West Bay Street, November 12.

A panel of speakers from the BEST Commission in the Ministry of the Environment, and Bahamas Electricity Corporation also addressed the government’s National Energy Policy.

Representatives attended from the U S Embassy, including former ambassador to The Bahamas, Ned Seigel.

The Government is seeking feedback on its National Energy Policy Report, a copy of which can be obtained by from the BEST Commission’s website.

Mr Neymour said the Government encourages Bahamians and other residents to give their comments and join the campaign to reduce the negative effect that fossil fuel dependency has placed on the environment.

“I am disappointed that we have not had significant contributions from the general public on that report,” said Mr Neymour.

“I see a number of comments in the press about us not moving ahead, in regards to National Energy Policy and initiatives, but very little input is being provided from the general public.”

The Government is “eager” to put the National Energy Policy in place and has set a December 2009 deadline for its implementation, he said.

“We have had significant contributions from the IDB regarding the formulation of the policy,” said Mr Neymour. “They have assisted us with technical co-operations that deal with strengthening the energy sector, reviewing our regulatory framework, and addressing promoting sustainable energy in The Bahamas.

“We are also reviewing our ‘waste to energy’ program, our national energy efficiency program, and our access to renewable energy potential throughout The Bahamas. We have signed contracts and are proceeding in that direction.”

The Government is taking the energy sector “very serious” and has granted licenses for the production of bio-diesel in New Providence, Grand Bahama, and Abaco.

“We are pleased with the initiatives taken and we expect within a year to see some of the fruits of our labor over the last two years,” said Mr Neymour.


November 16, 2009 | 11:27 PM Comments  {num} comments



calieel   calieel Rashad Amahad's TIGblog
Rashad Amahad's profile

We must join in for the unity and the strenght of the Bahamas
Related to country: Bahamas


That is right we have to fight for the right of our freedoms which alot of people seem to take for granted.What is interesting is that you only care about the hospital when you have to go there and the same goes on for every other agency of government that seems inadequate.It seems as if this is prodominent in my culture.Where are the forward thinkers? are we trying to cultivate these type of people.If you are extremely bright in America they have scouts out in every field looking to recruit you.I assume every one wants a winning team however someone has to ensure the checks and balances in getting it are in place.We in the Bahamas just wait and see .......wow.It reminds me of how you teach a dog to just sniff for a particular thing,ie drugs bombs etc.The general thinking is someone will do it for me .Where did we get it from and why have we not lost it?There is no free lunch and if it is given to you some body still paid for it.I told my children along time ago that I buy the gifts under the christmas tree and give them the option if they want them wrapped and have to deal with the mess of cleaning the whole thing up when they are tired of seeing it basically when the advertisers are on to the next thing.This is a real world and we must approach it with the seriousness it deserves.

The leaders of course who stand to benefit more want to monpolise the system that is why they are all drunk when it comes to the power they have sought not realising how vast the scope of it is,they are not going to tell you like the money will run out when they do.This is sad it starts from the top and breeds a culture of distrust and abuse of these powers.If I go to florida to shop and someone ask me where did I get a particular item from I am more than happy to share with them the knowledge so that we all could benefit but it seems for some there is the feeling of the complete opposite.When are we going to grow up and realise the more we have the better it is for all.

This is a principal that should be employed in every area of life.The Bahamas is still brain washed with the colonial stlye thinking they should always serve never let them own.the personalities have changed the principal still seems to be entrench.I will fight until this distasteful scourge is uprooted and the liberation of my people are restore we must free ourselves from this mental slavery.
One Bahamas united in love and in service.Each one reach and teach one .

November 16, 2009 | 8:43 AM Comments  {num} comments

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calieel   calieel Rashad Amahad's TIGblog
Rashad Amahad's profile

Where are the elder stateman?
Related to country: Bahamas


How do you leave your children,when they are still toddlers? We would think that they should be near by holding their hands as they grow.The in the Bahamas we are very much a young nation and I mention this by no way as a excuse for any of our shortcomings,what I expect is the elder statemen sharing their opinions to the public and the leading men in the political arena.Going to the colleges,schools and speaking to the future of the nation about nation hood where they would like to see the Bahamas in the future and the roads to take to get there.The senior politicans grooming the junior turks to take the mantle of a Bahamas leaving behind a legacy,let us look to the USA how the former presidents go around speaking about their beloved country,the strenghts the hopes.The formulation of libraries, fondations institutions that say this country that has afforded them such a good life now it is their time to be seen as giving back to the country that has given them so much.
Our thinking we must be bigger in our thoughts and our actions for the greater good of the country.I call on the elder statesmen to do their civic duty.Where is your tribute where is your honor to the in which your serve,has yur service been relegated to the time of active service,This love for my country burns brighter every day.I hope you will allow this spark to catch a blaze for younger Bahamians to take a pride for the beautiful Bahamaland.

November 15, 2009 | 12:40 PM Comments  {num} comments

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calieel   calieel Rashad Amahad's TIGblog
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Where are the elder stateman?
Related to country: Bahamas


How do you leave your children,when they are still toddlers? We would think that they should be near by holding their hands as they grow.The in the Bahamas we are very much a young nation and I mention this by no way as a excuse for any of our shortcomings,what I expect is the elder statemen sharing their opinions to the public and the leading men in the political arena.Going to the colleges,schools and speaking to the future of the nation about nation hood where they would like to see the Bahamas in the future and the roads to take to get there.The senior politicans grooming the junior turks to take the mantle of a Bahamas leaving behind a legacy,let us look to the USA how the former presidents go around speaking about their beloved country,the strenghts the hopes.The formulation of libraries, fondations institutions that say this country that has afforded them such a good life now it is their time to be seen as giving back to the country that has given them so much.
Our thinking we must be bigger in our thoughts and our actions for the greater good of the country.I call on the elder statesmen to do their civic duty.Where is your tribute where is your honor to the in which your serve,has yur service been relegated to the time of active service,This love for my country burns brighter every day.I hope you will allow this spark to catch a blaze for younger Bahamians to take a pride for the beautiful Bahamaland.

November 15, 2009 | 12:40 PM Comments  {num} comments

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calieel   calieel Rashad Amahad's TIGblog
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Sir Orville Turnquest QC the former Governor General of the Bahamas.
Related to country: Bahamas


In my humble oppinion this man did a great job as Governor General and certainly exemplifies the word of Statesman.He push through the politics and push the unity of the Bahamas.ONE BAHAMAS.This is what is needed in these time someone to bring about the commonwealth of the people in the Bahamas.This is what I suppose the Governor job is he or she should be seen as the one who transends politics and bridges the gap that we are very much together.The Bahamas is certainly one however the man on the ground will tell you something different.Sir Orville did just that he spread the message that we all should be reminded of. In his position is was not seen as bantering for a particular side.He represented the whole.We need another like him it seems as though they have dropped the ball in the governor generals office we need another champion of One Bahamas.

November 13, 2009 | 2:00 PM Comments  {num} comments

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prany   prany Hannah George's TIGblog
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Recruting great people to join my Shell-Craft website.
Related to country: Bahamas


Hi, i am requesting to all who are intested in arts or craft work, no matter what kind it is, can you consider contacting me via my email. I would be delighted to have you join my website as a member, there is no work involve. You will just enjoy first hand the great thrill of viewing highly innovative and creative art pieces by me, and other little perks. You will also be as a representative alongside me as my Shell-Craft website grows. I would appreciate and welcome whoever is interested. Just let me know, and I will send you a member's request to join. Thanks alot, have a great day!

November 13, 2009 | 1:28 PM Comments  {num} comments

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